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We all know what tonight is, right? Yes, it's new Hitch-Hiker's night. 6:30, Radio 4. Listen, enjoy. The rather fantastic preview trailer thing is here.

Andrew Marr explains how to read newspapers [via itchyfidget]

'This kitten does not share your values' and others. I smell meme potential! [via communicator]

The Interstitial Library [via Theodora Goss]

'Tourism', a new short story by M John Harrison. [via Jonathan Strahan]

If it wasn't for the fact that this job is based in New York, I might actually be tempted to apply...

EDIT And there's a good interview with Ian R Macleod at Infinity Plus, talking about the differences between short fiction and long fiction, and between genre and mainstream.
 
 
 
 
 
 


Is this a real person?
As far as I know. He produced the R4 adaptation of Voyage as well (and I think maybe that UK Independence Day thing).

I hadn't ever seen a picture before. He looks exactly like a Dirk, too. :)
6:30, though. Don't they know that geeky young professionals never get home until at least 7?
Ah, but geeky young professionals are assumed to have The Internet, and thus able to take advantage of listen again. ;-)
Only through filthy Real Player though :(
I'm told alt.binaries.sounds.radio.bbc might be what you want...
That NYC job looks cool ... but I know what you mean. NYC is a whole other order of mad living.
And in ANOTHER COUNTRY.

Although I think I might apply just out of curiousity.
Well that goes without saying, NYC is virtually another country from the United States. ;-)
Also ... would you seriously find it so difficult to live & work in another country, even a nominally English-speaking one???
Probably not, once I made the decision to go. It would just be a hard decision to make.
Really? I guess I'm an odd one. I feel that with the Internet, keeping in touch with 'home' is profoundly easy...even too easy, since it might make integration with one's new 'home' more difficult.

The question is whether overseas experience is seen as a boon to one's career ... or a devalued distraction from the necessary office politicking.

---

Speaking for myself - my only challenge is the permits process...waiting, costs, and work offer needs.
I missed HH. I will listen to it at some point. Probably by buying the CDs and listening to it all in one go. Perhaps in bed. This is like eating an entire catering-size tub of ice cream in one sitting, but without the risk of diabetes and your shit going white.

The Marr article is superb. However, i quibble with this:

Hundreds of dodgy academic departments put out bogus or trivial pieces of research purely designed to impress busy newspaper people and win themselves some cheap publicity which can in turn be used in their next funding applications.


This isn't about dodgy departments, it's about dodgy PR people; you can do some perfectly innocent and sound research on, say, the regulation of NADPH oxidase by Rho GTPases, and the PR people will puff it as "Our scientists discover cure for cancer!". Universities etc desperately crave coverage in newspapers; individual academics mostly couldn't give the pericaudal segment of a Rattus norvegicus.

I was interested in the way Marr sees the newssphere in terms of journalists, not newspapers; i'd love to read a meta-newspaper edited by him, composed of the output of the columnists he likes, perhaps annotated with his opinion of their biases and particular expertise.

I suspect (and hope) that we are perhaps only a few years away from seeing exactly that; after all, these articles are mostly available online, so it's just a matter of links (or rather, the usual stealing-back-the-revolution blob of perl/mySQL/RSS to harvest and collate the links for you). If that took off - and it would require some changes to copyright law to really work - it could completely change the face of news. We'd have the sort of perfect free-market hojillion-channel anarchist/libertarian/geek wet dream that we always wanted. It's just a question of metadata. Google are probably already working on it. Dude.

Kittens <3 terrr!

If someone could point me at the catalogue for the interstitial library, that would be really useful. Thanks.

Whole other order of mad living = WORD. Apply. I will let you off not living in London if you live in New York. Alternatively, hold off for about three years - i have an idea to head over there myself for a bit of postdoccing; we should organise some sort of mass exodus.

-- tom
Metamarginalia


If you can't beat 'em ...

your shit going white


This is a 253 reference (http://www.ryman-novel.com/car6/201.htm).

some perfectly innocent and sound research on, say, the regulation of NADPH oxidase by Rho GTPases


This is a rather innacurate description of the excited media (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/3485508.stm) response (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=%2Fnews%2F2004%2F02%2F26%2Fnrad26.xml) (it made the front page of the Evening Standard) to a press release (http://www.ucl.ac.uk/media/archive/archive-release/?oxygen) from UCL describing some research (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=14985765)
published by a scientist called Tony Segal (http://www.ucl.ac.uk/CMM/CBP%20AW%20Segal%20.html). It is inaccurate because it actually has nothing to do with NADPH oxidase (although this is regulated by Rho GTPases, and is involved with the system being studied), but is about the role of potassium channels in the killing of bacteria by white blood cells. Moreover, although the paper itself is sound, the responsibility for the puffery does not lie entirely with the PR department: Segal was utterly complicit in over-selling it. He asserts that his work, which is about our understanding of how white blood cells kill bacteria, has implications for the role of free radicals in cancer, which is, to be frank, tripe. It doesn't take a great deal of knowledge about this aspect of cancer biology (my level will do) to realise that his statements are utterly specious - my supervisor at the time, who works on this, laughed out loud. How they made it out of his office, let alone into print, defies explanation.

pericaudal segment


'Anus' would be far more accurate, but sadly, too obvious.

newssphere


Pun on 'noosphere (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noosphere)'. Also a faint reference to The Day Today (http://www.bbc.co.uk/comedy/guide/articles/d/daytodaythe_66602470.shtml)'s 'factmosphere'.

stealing-back-the-revolution


An NTK (http://www.ntk.net/index.cgi?b=02004-09-17&l=216#l) reference.

-- tom
[commentary]

He's off again.

How they made it out of his office, let alone into print, defies explanation.

It's less inexplicable once you've worked in that side of the business, to be honest...
He's off again

A reference to this thread.
i'd love to read a meta-newspaper edited by him, composed of the output of the columnists he likes, perhaps annotated with his opinion of their biases and particular expertise.

This was pretty much my exact reaction to the story. I'd like to know which columnists to follow, but at the moment I don't, and I don't really want to spare the time. I'd like someone else to do the legwork for me.

I will let you off not living in London if you live in New York.

Thanks. 'preciate that.